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Congressman Evan Jenkins

Representing the 3rd District of West Virginia

REP. JENKINS PRAISES EPA FOR STOPPING ANTI-COAL RULE

October 9, 2017
Press Release
EPA announces end of Obama administration’s key anti-coal rule

WASHINGTON – U.S. Representative Evan Jenkins (R-W.Va.) praised the Trump administration’s announcement today that it will formally end the so-called Clean Power Plan rule. This rule was a key part of the previous administration’s anti-coal agenda.

“After eight years of radical environmental policies from the White House, we now have a president focused on bringing coal jobs back. President Trump promised to fight for our miners and our way of life, and he is keeping his word. The Obama administration used this rule to pick winners and losers at the expense of West Virginia’s jobs. I will continue to work with President Trump on solutions that will move West Virginia forward, create more jobs, and return the EPA to its core mission,” Rep. Jenkins said.

Rep. Jenkins joined a number of his colleagues in filing an amicus brief in support of West Virginia’s court case against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and its existing coal-fired power plant regulation. Please click here to read the brief.

He has also voted repeatedly to stop implementation of the Obama-era coal-fired power plant regulations, including helping to pass a congressional resolution of disapproval of the rule. He supported passage of the Ratepayer Protection Act, which would ensure states would not be forced to implement a state or federal plan if it would significantly hurt consumers or the reliability of the state’s electrical system.

Through his work on the House Appropriations Committee, Rep. Jenkins secured policy riders in spending bills that would prohibit funding for the job-killing power plan. Finally, the congressman has introduced legislation, the Transparency and Honesty in Energy Regulations Act, which would prohibit the EPA and the Energy Department from using the social cost of carbon and social cost of methane as rationales for their costly and burdensome regulations.